Archive for the ‘The New iPad’ Category

A new games magazine for iPad: iGamer

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

Videogames on iPad are different. The good ones are difficult to find, the bad ones are all too easy to stumble upon. They rarely cost more than a few pounds, and sometimes they’re completely free. There’s no need to clear out the living room for several hours or to be intimately familiar with a 12-button control pad; They feel more wary of your time, and more eager to please straight away.

Most games on the App Store aren’t the result of greenlight processes and market research. There are no discs to print nor boxes to distribute. Now, videogames are developed and released directly onto the App Store, and often rise to the top based on their quality and through word of mouth. Games studios have greater creative freedom, and most thrilling of all, the really good new iPad games feel different. Daring, and new.

iGamer is CVG’s newly relaunched sister publication. It is exclusive to iPad through Apple Newsstand, and it is exclusively about iPad games. It has been designed to address and acknowledge this exciting new breed of videogame.

iPhone / iPod Touch Screenshot I don’t want to trawl through twenty or thirty games Apple has recommended – I want to know which ones are the best, and what they’re like to play all in one place. I want to know which games fit a certain purpose, or a particular mood i’m in. I want to know more about this exciting, explosive new creative industry that is rising out of the App Store. I want to know about the games I may have missed, and why I should download them.

In every issue of iGamer you can find the fifteen best new games from the last month’s releases. iGamer editorial is direct and upfront. You will discover what they’re like to play and why you might like them quickly, and you can download them now with a tap of your finger.

Tablet Android 7 pollici Capacitivo
Tablet Android 7 pollici Capacitivoonly €80.10

Playlists are games I recommend based on a theme, be it to keep the kids quiet or to indulge in some videogame nostalgia. Insider is the features section, in which you’ll find interviews and insight into the MÓVIL DUAL SIM ANDROID games industry, plus behind-the-scenes tales of games development. In the relaunch issue, we have interviews with Rovio, Activision, Chillingo, the and the developers of Punch Quest and SpellTower. Classics is iGamer’s directory; 50 games we’d recommend to anyone, plus a re-appraisal of a recent inductee into iGamer’s hall of fame.

iPhone / iPod Touch Screenshot The relaunch issue is free for a limited time. If you enjoy what you read, you can subscribe and get each issue for 69p. I’m confident that minuscule monthly outlay will save you both time and money wasted on taking a punt on an unknown New & Noteworthy game.

Hands On iPad Mini

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

Apple iPad miniApple’s trying to create a new market with the iPad mini: premium small tablets. Its chief tools are the mini’s spectacular, nearly surreal build quality and its amazing array of apps. But unlike other Apple products, the mini isn’t necessarily a slam-dunk because of its high price and odd ergonomics. I spent a little while with it at the launch event; here’s what I think.

The Apple iPad mini may be the most beautifully built device I’ve ever seen. It’s amazingly thin at 0.28 inches and whisper-light at 10.9 ounces; where the bright LCD screen joins the aluminum body there’s a simple beveled metal edge, like on the edge of the iPhone 5. I kept thinking of the iPhone 5 when I was holding it, but also of the HTC One S, another example of sublime material design. It feels years ahead of the current iPad, and even of other high-quality metal tablets like the Asus Transformer series. It’s amazing what an invisible seam can do. Every other tablet feels cheap now.

The device works almost exactly like a shrunken-down iPad 2 $399.00 at Apple Store. Same apps, same screen resolution, same performance. Everything’s a little smaller and a little sharper than on the iPad 2 because the pixels are smaller, but it’s not a Retina display. It’s not even as tight as the screen on the Kindle Fire HD.

Apple’s making a big bet that the 275,000 iPad apps will make a difference here, and I think that’s a good bet to make. As Apple showed on stage and as I’ve recounted several times, the 275,000 apps designed for Apple’s iPad generally beat Android tablet apps, brutally. Seven-inch Android tablets have been able to coast along because blown-up phone apps don’t look outright bad on their screens, the way they do on 10-inch tablets. But tablet apps look even better, and Apple’s got more of ’em.

Mini I-phone Style Anycool Dual Sim
I939 Mini I-phone Style Anycool Dual Simonly € 59,00

A Mini Tablet For a Maxi Hand

The mini makes two ergonomic missteps, though, which is surprising for Apple.

The first one is subtle, and worthy of further study. When developers write iPad apps, they assume a certain number of pixels per inch. Remember how Steve Jobs went on and on about iPad virtual buttons being just the right size for fingers? Fingers don’t change, but the buttons just did, because the same number of pixels now covers less ground.

I found this to be a noticeable, but not overwhelming difference in apps like Kayak, Facebook, and CNN. The touch buttons are a little smaller. With the regular iPad, you don’t have to move all that precisely; this little iPad demands a little more exactitude. It’ll take some more time to find out whether this makes a noticeable difference in usability.

MICRO SD 4GB SANDISK
MICRO SD 4GB SANDISK only € 5,90

The iPad mini is also not a one-handed tablet. At 5.3 inches wide (to the Nexus 7’s 4.7 inches), it’s just too wide. The reality distortion field around this fact was unusually strong, but let’s remember that Apple is selling the iPhone 5 as better than the competition at one-handed use specifically because of how narrow it is. Now here comes the iPad mini, which is a better one-handed tablet because … it’s wider than the competition.

I know there are all different sizes of hands, and mine are pretty small. But there’s no denying that the additional width makes a significant ergonomic difference, and it isn’t in the iPad mini’s favor. The very narrow bezel makes the problem worse, not better, as there’s less of an area to grip the tablet by without activating the touch screen.

Unfocus yourself from that “one-handed” idea, though, and you see the iPad mini being a top tablet for kids, especially in education. It’s a four-fifths-scale iPad; they’re four-fifths-scale people. Apple reaches out to schools and helps design curricula, which often involve iPad-only apps. Savings from the lower price add up when you intend to buy in bulk and your choices are iPad or nothing, because only the iPad offers the educational books, apps and resources you want.

It’s no concidence that Apple talked extensively about iBooks and schools during this product launch. They’re the prime target.

Now, About That Price …
The iPad mini costs $329, which is a lot more than the $199 that Amazon and Google are charging for the Kindle Fire HD and Nexus 7. That’s not fatal, though.

Apple is selling this as a premium small tablet, and if anyone can pull that off, Apple can. Apple thinks it can charge the premium for all of the well-known advantages its ecosystem has – not only the 275,000 apps, but the wide variety of accessories and the in-person support and sales experience at Apple Stores.

The stellar build quality is the physical element which should seal the deal on the price. To quote the highest praise from judges on “Project Runway,” it feels expensive. This is critical. At $299 it would have been a deal; at $329, it has a chance.

Apple iPad Mini configurations and prices revealed

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

Prices for various memory and wireless combinations for the unannounced tablet allegedly depicted in screenshot from European retail giant’s inventory system.

Apple has not yet even acknowledged the existence of the iPad Mini, but pricing and configuration information for the much-rumored tablet is allegedly already appearing in the inventory system of a consumer electronics giant.

The iPad Mini will come in 16 different memory and wireless configurations, according to an inventory system screenshot obtained by MobileGeeks. The screen capture allegedly comes from the internal inventory system of Media Market, Europe’s largest electronics retailer.

The page — in German — lists pricing for various configurations in euros, presumably with Europe’s 19 percent value-added tax already factored into the price. Prices will start at 249 euros ($322) for a Wi-Fi-only 8GB iPad Mini, with other memory configurations of 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB also available. The high-end 64GB cellular version is listed at about $650, presumably with 4G LTE capability.

iPad Mini rumors have been swirling for months, with various sources reporting that the device will feature a 7.85-inch display and go on sale for a price that’s far cheaper than Apple’s current, larger tablet.

CUSTODIA IPAD IN PELLE + TASTIERA INTEGRATA
CUSTODIA IPAD IN PELLE + TASTIERA INTEGRATAonly € 19,00

Apple has reportedly already begun mass production of the new tablet, which is expected to be introduced on October 23. However, one Asia news outlet reports that production issues will delay its debut .

Apple has reportedly ordered 10 million units of the unannounced tablet for the fourth quarter, roughly twice what Amazon reportedly ordered for the Kindle Fire for the same quarter.

How to Turn your iPhone 4/4S or iPad into a personal WiFi hotspot

Monday, June 18th, 2012
Add a “personal Wi-Fi hotspot” to your iPhone to share your 3G Internet connection with other devices

Need a quick hit of wireless Internet for your laptop when you’re out and about? Here’s how to set up a “personal WiFi hotspot” – also known as ‘wireless tethering’ – on your iPhone 4 or 4S.

You can also create a personal hotspot on the ‘new iPad’ (aka iPad 3) if you’re got a 3G iPad, thanks to a recent software update issued by Apple.

Sadly, the personal hotspot feature isn’t available on the iPhone 3G or 3GS or the original iPad or iPad 2.

How it works

The personal hotspot feature turns your iDevice’s 3G signal into a short-range wireless hotspot, just like you’d find a cafe or hotel lobby.

But unlike those open networks your iPad or iPhone hotspot comes with automatic password protection so that nobody else can hitch a free ride on your private wireless network.

Up to five devices can connect to the net via your iPhone at once. That makes it ideal for connecting your laptop and a Wi-Fi iPad at the same time, for example, when you’re on the road.

Mini elicottero telecomandato F161

Here’s what you’ll see on your iPad’s screen when the new Apple software is made available over the 3G network.

How to set up your iPhone or iPad hotspot

These instrutions apply to the new iPad as well as the iPhone 4 and 4S.

Go to the settings menu:

In settings, you’ll see a ‘personal hotspot’ menu item. Tap it.

In the personal hotspot menu, slide the “personal hotspot” option to “on”.

You’ll note that Apple has allocated the connection a default password which is shown on this screen too. You can either use it (as each iPhone 4 gets a different random password) or change it to something you can more easily remember by tapping on it.

Then, on your computer’s Wi-Fi menu, you should see your iPhone pop up in the list after a few seconds. The network name is the name of your iPhone in iTunes — in our case, “Dan’s iPhone 4”.

Once the network is selected and you’ve put in the password you selected in the last step (or Apple’s default password), you’ll be able to connect your tablet, laptop and any other Wi-Fi device to the net via your iPhone’s data plan.

Bear in mind that the feature does tend to use up a fair bit of battery power, so use it sparingly if the phone is already on low battery power. If you’ve got the iPhone’s power adaptor handy and are near an AC powerpoint, plug in your iPhone to top up the battery while you work.

New iPad One Big Defect

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012
IPhoto

IPhoto (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Apple introduces its new iPad 3, and you can also see long lines of amateur peoples on big stores to buy it. And it is supposed to be better than older model in feature and appearance. And now it becomes people need. But now it’s one of the biggest defects comes in front.

The defect is that it heat up so fast. Its screen is so sharp but it will so hotter that it causes difficult to handle it. This complaint comes from its many users.

But its new retina screen is new thing. And after coming this retina screen a race of computer programmers is start to make new apps for it and can take more benefits from it. This screen gives better results of eBook than printed book on paper. And because of it now it becomes more interesting to play games on it. And by using new app STAR WALK you can view space in a new style and you can 0.3 million stars at a time on screen. Its processor is so strong and you can easily play Nintendo 3D games on it.

PELLICOLA IPAD PROTETTIVA PROTEZIONE DISPLAY
PELLICOLA IPAD PROTETTIVA PROTEZIONE DISPLAY I-PAD

Apple modifies it app especially for it. And specially apples modify its GARAGEBAND app for music and make it more interesting. And for iPhoto (app) they give shortcut on screen for editing photo directly by cut paste, changing light and for easily adding digital affects. And one of its most useful apps is DIARY, which helps to manage daily life. But in last the problem is that after using it for long time makes it hotter, and this is major problem in mostly hotter countries.

Are there any discounts available on Apple New iPad?

Monday, April 9th, 2012

The magical pad is back with new and innovative features! Since the invention of this super cool gadget the experience of mobility and portability of computer has become a treat. The techno-fever has dashed millions of people already. And Apple continues to make improvements in its dashing devices.

Apple remains the king of the touch tablets. It has been setting up trends in the field of technology and others have been following it. With others on the move to make better internet tablets Apple has brought forth its Golden Bow, the iPad 3 or The New iPad as said by Apple.

Many of you may be thinking how to purchase, when Apple accessories are far too expensive than the other electronic devices available in the market. That is a problem indeed! But you can always get Apple discount coupons and enjoy electronic bargain. Though you may not be able to find discounts on The New iPad but there are discounts available on other accessories of Apple. And if you are thinking that there would be discounts for students on iPad 3 then you are gravely mistaken. There are no such discounts available in the market, but if do find some they will be too small to make a difference in the retail price of the iPad. However, Apple products may be expensive but they are worth the price.

With retina display and 2048-by-1536 splendid resolution, this new iPad has made a huge difference. The resolution makes the text on the screen appear razor sharp making it several times easier to read than it was in the previous iPads and other such Android Tablet devices. In the same 9.7-inche display space it has 3.1 million pixels. This is four times the number present in the screen of iPad 2 and a million more than an HDTV screen. Its quad-core graphics processing makes everything incredibly responsive. So playing games and watching videos becomes more than just fun. With all the old features like swiping, scrolling, and pinching you can also edit photos in the new iPhoto, apply titles and transitions in iMovie.

iPhone, iPod and iPad 2’s cameras have been phenomenal already and this time Apple has come up with 5-megapixel iSight camera in iPad 3. This smart camera is designed with advanced optics. It shoots photos with high resolution and makes video with 1080p HD. The battery time remains the same (i.e. 10 hours) even after all these extraordinary features.

PELLICOLA IPAD PROTETTIVA PROTEZIONE DISPLAY I-PADonly € 2,99

However, there is room for improvement in this perfectly fitting tablet that copes with most of the demands of the new generation.

The data transfer from one iPad to another remains an issue. There is no feature built-in for data transfer in the new iPad 3. Those addicted to iPhone and iPod have no problems. But I suggest that Apple should come up with some wireless data transfer technology for its cellular devices. SD card may seem to be an old idea for iPod, iPhone or iPad but I think it is a good way of storing media and data that is not in the format that iDevices can read.

iPad Custodia in gomma

Custodia in gomma Ipad€ 9,90

However, the demands will never end! But ‘With greater power comes greater responsibility.’ Apple as the king of the computing industry should be ready to face the challenges and prepare to compete with the demands of the present generation.

The problem of high prices, wireless-data-transfer and SD card slot are being addressed in Apple’s own way. Like granting of Apple coupons and promo codes to coupons websites is a sure attempt to give discounts on iAccessories. iCloud is an attempt to satisfy ‘data-transfer-geeks’. So either the teachos learn the Apple-ways or they keep making Apple aware of their demands. But either way Apple will have to work harder to make its customer happier, not only with sturdy technology but sure discounts to keep the pace!

See more

Apple New iPad: Is It Worth The Upgrade

Top Tips For Extending Your iPad Battery Life

Top 11 Tips to Save Your New iPad Battery Life

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Stop Pretending iPad Gaming Isn’t For Gamers

Friday, April 6th, 2012
i901c Dual sim Anycool ANDROID

It’s impossible to read a Kotaku comment thread about iPhone or iPad games without wading through a bevy of grumpy dissenters—disgruntled gamers who say things like “iPad games aren’t real games!” and “lol iPhone.”

This isn’t exactly surprising. A few weeks ago, I wrote an op-ed about how Apple’s ubiquitous devices won’t win over the living rooms of hardcore gamers. They just don’t have the controls.

But what gamers don’t seem to get is that the iPhone, iPad, and other mobile devices don’t need to replace our consoles. They’re separate entities. And they’re good enough on their own.

Look, I totally understand where the dissenters are coming from. Just a few years ago, I was one of them. I’d grumble whenever Japanese developers like Square Enix created games likeFinal Fantasy IV: The After Years for mobile platforms. I’d sigh at the thought of kids playing games on phones and tablets while riding the bus to school. Why weren’t they gaming on DSs and PSPs?

Then I got an iPhone. And slowly but surely, I started to realize how much gaming potential it really had.

Sure, many of its cheap games are mindless timewasters. Games like Angry Birds and Jetpack Joyride have found success with the “pick up and play for 30 seconds or two hours” model. And it can be hard to sort through the junk ripoffs and clones and other nonsense on Apple’s iTunes Store.

Tablet Android 7” MID-070-B1
iPhones and iPads are now a playground for independent developers.

But it’s becoming clear that the iOS library goes way deeper than that. Deep, original games like Chaos Ringsand Sword & Poker 2 have stolen quite a few hours of my time. Ports like Final Fantasy Tactics and Secret of Manaprove that even the classics can work well on touch screens. And the upcoming iPad remakes of Baldur’s Gateand Baldur’s Gate II are two of my most-anticipated games of the year.

What’s better, iPhones and iPads are now a playground for independent developers. The iOS model does not resemble console or handheld gaming—it resembles PC gaming. Developers have the flexibility to experiment with form, mechanics, and price. And although I’ve heard some not-so-great things about the iTunes Store’s review process, it certainly beats catering to the whims of a deep-pocketed, bureaucratic publisher. At the way-too-reasonable asking point of $0.99 a pop, games can find a level of tremendous financial success they’d never see on the Xbox or PlayStatiom PS3Break.

While console makers struggle to find ways to eliminate used games and usher their customers into the digital age, iOS is already there. Mobile developers don’t have to worry that GameStop is running its own garage sale with their products. Every iTunes purchase is a new purchase.

As for the iTunes Store’s biggest advantage over GameStop? Shopping there won’t make you feel like you need a shower.

It’s important to note that iOS games aren’t going to kill consoles anytime soon (and that it’s silly to even have that conversation). But as gamers, we’d be remiss to ignore mobile and tablet gaming as an alternative to our standard consoles. And if you’re not playing games on a mobile or tablet device, you’re missing out on some wonderful experiences. So please, stop pretending iPhone and iPad games aren’t real games. You’re only fooling yourself.

It’s impossible to read a Kotaku comment thread about iPhone or iPad games without wading through a bevy of grumpy dissenters—disgruntled gamers who say things like “iPad games aren’t real games!” and “lol iPhone.”

This isn’t exactly surprising. A few weeks ago, I wrote an op-ed about how Apple’s ubiquitous devices won’t win over the living rooms of hardcore gamers. They just don’t have the controls.

But what gamers don’t seem to get is that the iPhone, iPad, and other mobile devices don’t need to replace our consoles. They’re separate entities. And they’re good enough on their own.

Look, I totally understand where the dissenters are coming from. Just a few years ago, I was one of them. I’d grumble whenever Japanese developers like Square Enix created games likeFinal Fantasy IV: The After Years for mobile platforms. I’d sigh at the thought of kids playing games on phones and tablets while riding the bus to school. Why weren’t they gaming on DSs and PSPs?

Then I got an iPhone. And slowly but surely, I started to realize how much gaming potential it really had.

Sure, many of its cheap games are mindless timewasters. Games like Angry Birds and Jetpack Joyride have found success with the “pick up and play for 30 seconds or two hours” model. And it can be hard to sort through the junk ripoffs and clones and other nonsense on Apple’s iTunes Store.

iPhones and iPads are now a playground for independent developers.

But it’s becoming clear that the iOS library goes way deeper than that. Deep, original games like Chaos Ringsand Sword & Poker 2 have stolen quite a few hours of my time. Ports like Final Fantasy Tactics and Secret of Manaprove that even the classics can work well on touch screens. And the upcoming iPad remakes of Baldur’s Gateand Baldur’s Gate II are two of my most-anticipated games of the year.

What’s better, iPhones and iPads are now a playground for independent developers. The iOS model does not resemble console or handheld gaming—it resembles PC gaming. Developers have the flexibility to experiment with form, mechanics, and price. And although I’ve heard some not-so-great things about the iTunes Store’s review process, it certainly beats catering to the whims of a deep-pocketed, bureaucratic publisher. At the way-too-reasonable asking point of $0.99 a pop, games can find a level of tremendous financial success they’d never see on the Xbox or PlayStation.

While console makers struggle to find ways to eliminate used games and usher their customers into the digital age, iOS is already there. Mobile developers don’t have to worry that GameStop is running its own garage sale with their products. Every iTunes purchase is a new purchase.

As for the iTunes Store’s biggest advantage over GameStop? Shopping there won’t make you feel like you need a shower.

It’s important to note that iOS games aren’t going to kill consoles anytime soon (and that it’s silly to even have that conversation). But as gamers, we’d be remiss to ignore mobile and tablet gaming as an alternative to our standard consoles. And if you’re not playing games on a mobile or tablet device, you’re missing out on some wonderful experiences. So please, stop pretending iPhone and iPad games aren’t real games. You’re only fooling yourself.

See also

Top 26 best role playing games ever

More Epic Mickey 3DS Screenshots Revealed

Top 50 free apps for new iPad 2 and new iPad 2012

Monday, March 26th, 2012

On comparing iPad apps with iPhone equivalents, one thing rapidly becomes clear: apps for Apple’s tablet are pricier.

Many of the best free iPhone apps cost 59p or more in their iPad incarnations, and the quality level of what’s still free is often ropey. But among the dross lie rare gems – iPad apps that are so good you can’t believe they’re still free.

Of those we unearthed, here is our pick of the best free iPad apps – they also run on iPad 2. (Note that apps marked ‘universal’ will run on your iPad and iPhone, optimising themselves accordingly.)

You can also check out our quick video run down of the top 5

1. AccuWeather for iPad

Annoyingly, most free iPad weather apps refuse to believe that the UK has any weather (or that the country exists), so AccuWeather gets props for merely working. Happily, AccuWeather also proves to be a decent – if quirky – weather app. The interface is odd (but fun) and there’s a ‘lifestyle’ page that determines how your current local conditions might affect over 20 activities, including dog-walking and stargazing.

2. Adobe Ideas 1.0 for iPad

Adobe Ideas 1.0 for iPad is a digital sketchpad that offers simple vector-based drawing tools and works nicely as a standalone app for jotting down creative ideas or as a companion to Adobe Illustrator. Usefully, you can trace over photos, email drawings as PDFs and avoid worrying about mistakes, because there’s a 50-level undo.

3. Air Video Free (universal)

Despite naysayers whining about the iPad screen’s 4:3 aspect ratio, it’s a decent device for watching video, although it lacks storage for housing large video collections. Air Video enables you to stream video (converting it on-the-fly, if necessary) from your Mac or PC. The main limitation of the free version is that it only shows a few items (randomly selected) from each folder or playlist.

4. Beatwave (universal)

Beatwave is a simplified Tenori-On-style synth which enables you to rapidly build pleasing melodies by prodding a grid. Multiple layers and various instruments provide scope for complex compositions, and you can save sessions or, handily, store and share compositions via email. You can also buy more instruments via in-app purchases.

5. Bloomberg for iPad

With an eye-searing white-and-orange-on-black colour scheme that’s a little like being repeatedly punched in the eyes, Bloomberg isn’t an app you’ll want to spend all day staring at. However, for business news, stocks and major currency rates, it’s a usable and efficient app.

Bloomberg

6. Comics (universal)

On the iPhone, Comics is innovative, but zooming each panel and constantly rotating your device gets old fast. By contrast, the iPad’s screen is big enough to display an entire page without the need to zoom or scroll. And with dozens of free comics available via the bundled store, comic book fans should lap this app up.

7. Dictionary.com – Dictionary & Thesaurus – For iPad

We approached Dictionary with scepticism, since most free dictionary apps are sluggish interfaces to websites. That’s certainly what this looks like, but it works offline, providing speedy access to over a million words and 90,000 thesaurus entries. The app’s search is also reassuringly fast.

8. Dropbox (universal)

Dropbox is a great service for syncing documents across multiple devices. The iPad client works like the iPhone one (hardly surprising, since this is a universal app), enabling you to preview many file types and store those marked as favourites locally.

Dropbox

9. Evernote (universal)

Like Dropbox, Evernote (a free online service for saving ideas – text documents, images and web clips – that you can then access from multiple devices) works the same way on the iPad as it does on the iPhone. It benefits from the iPad’s larger screen, which enables you to see and navigate your stored snippets more easily.

Evernote

10. Feeddler RSS Reader for iPad

Feeddler RSS Reader for iPad is fairly basic as RSS readers go, but once you’ve pointed it at your Google Reader account it’s efficient, stores text offline, enables you to browse by feed and has a built-in browser so you’re not booted to Safari when you want to visit a link. As with many iPad apps, you get a full-screen view in portrait mode.

11. The Guardian Eyewitness

A showcase for engaging photography, The Guardian Eyewitness provides a daily, visual reflection of global events. You get access to the most recent 100 photos, which can be viewed full-screen or with a caption and ‘pro tip’. You can also save photos to your iPad or share them via email.

12. iBooks

Going head-to-head with Kindle, iBooks is a decent ebook reader, backed by the iBookstore. As you’d expect from Apple, the interface is polished (if not quite up to the standards of iPhone app Eucalyptus), and on downloading the app you get a free copy of Winnie the Pooh.

ibooks

13. IM+ (universal)

Although third-party multi-tasking is coming to the iPad this autumn, it’s not here yet, making things tough for instant messaging fans. However, IM+ Lite enables you to run a number of IM services (including Twitter and Facebook) in a single app, and there’s also a built-in web browser for checking out links.

14. Kindle (universal)

Amazon’s Kindle iPad app for reading over 500,000 books available at the Kindle Store is a little workmanlike, and doesn’t match the coherence of iBooks (you buy titles in Safari and ‘sync’ purchases via Kindle). However, Kindle’s fine for reading, and you get options to optimise your experience (including the ability to kill the naff page-turn animation and amend the page background to a pleasant sepia tone).

Kindle

15. Movies by Flixter (universal)

One for film buffs, Movies figures out where you are and tells you what’s showing in your local cinemas – or you can pick a film and it’ll tell you where and when it’s on. The app is functionally identical on iPad and iPhone, but again the extra screen space improves the experience.

Movies

16. PaperDesk Lite for iPad

Effectively a souped-up digital notepad, PaperDesk Lite for iPad enables you to combine typed words, scribbles and audio recordings in user-defined notebooks. Pages can be emailed (typed text is sent along with a copy of the entire page as a PDF), although be mindful that this free version restricts you to three pages per notebook.

PaperDesk lite

17. PCalc Lite (universal)

PCalc Lite‘s existence means the lack of a built-in iPad calculator doesn’t bother us (in fact, we’d love to replace the iPhone Calculator app with PCalc Lite as well). This app is usable and feature-rich – and if you end up wanting more, in-app purchases enable you to bolt on extras from the full PCalc.

PCalc

18. Reuters News Pro for iPad

Spurious anti-competition complaints meant the BBC News app took a while to come to the UK; in the meantime, Reuters offered the next best free news app for iPad with its Reuters News Pro for iPad. It’s a little US-centric, but can be skewed towards UK coverage via the Settings app, and it’s worth downloading for a more international take on news coverage than BBC News provides.

Reuters

19. Twitterrific for iPad

The iPad version of Twitterrific reportedly marks a new beginning for the app, which the developers think has become too complicated on iPhones. On iPad, things are more bare-bones, but this ensures Twitterrific is a simple, good-looking and usable Twitter client.

Twitteriffic

20. Wikipanion for iPad

The Wikipedia website works fine in Safari for iPad, but dedicated apps make navigating the site simpler and faster. We went back and forth betweenSimplepedia and Wikipanion, eventually plumping for the latter, largely due to its efficient two-pane landscape view with excellent bookmarking and history access.

Wikipanion

21. eBay for iPad

Use eBay for iPad and you’ll never touch eBay in a web browser again. It’s fast and efficient, beautifully showcasing important details and images in its main results view. The app also enables quickfire sorting and drag-based definition of price-ranges. It’s a little feature-light (no notifications), but eBay promises aspects of eBay Mobile will be integrated soon.

eBay for ipad

22. Soundrop (universal)

Soundrop is a minimal generative sound toy that offers an endless stream of balls, which make noises when they collide with and bounce off user-drawn lines. The overall result is surprisingly fun and hypnotic. For more advanced features – save, multiple instruments and gravity adjustment – there’s a £1.19 in-app ‘pro’ purchase option.

Soundrop

23. Granimator

Wallpaper apps litter the App Store, but are mostly dull, offering photos of brick walls or bored animals. Granimator is a bonkers art tool, enabling you to choose a background and spray all manner of shapes around. Compositions can be fine-tuned by dragging objects, and then shared to Flickr, Twitter or your device’s Photos app.

Granimator

24. Google Earth (universal)

It’s not the smoothest app in the world, and it lacks some elements from the desktop (such as street view), but Google Earth is nonetheless a joy on the iPad. Touch gestures are an intuitive means of swooping around the planet, and the optional layers enable you to display as much or as little ancillary information as you wish.

25. Explore Flickr (universal)

Explore Flickr provides an engaging way to discover new photography. On launch, your iPad screen fills with a grid of thumbnails, drawn from Flickr.com‘s top daily images. Tap one to view (and, if rights permit, download to your device), or just leave the app lazily updating (every now and again, a thumbnail spins to reveal a new image) while your iPad charges in its dock.

Explore flickr

26. Rj Voyager

One for budding iPad DJs, Rj Voyager enables you to choose from a selection of bundled tracks, turn parts on and off and edit parameters in real-time via an intuitive, futuristic interface. Play through headphones or a decent sound system and the result is infectious.

27. BBC News (universal)

With the BBC’s website still reliant on Flash video, this BBC News app – now finally available in the UK – provides access to latest stories, including video elements. Categories can be rearranged, stories can be shared and the app’s layout adjusts to portrait and landscape orientations.

BBC news

28. Epicurious (universal)

Tens of thousands of recipes at your fingertips (as long as you have a web connection) ensure Epicurious is worth a download for the culinary-inclined. The app even composes a shopping list for recipes; it’s just a pity it doesn’t include measurements for those of us who use that new-fangled metric system.

Epicurious

29. WordPress (universal)

This official, open-source WordPress app is perhaps a bit basic for composing anything but text-based blog posts from scratch, since the editor is HTML-only (sorry, WordPress Visual editor fans – both of you). However, it’s great for making quick edits to existing content, and for managing comments.

WordPress

30. TV Guide for iPad

It’s crazy that TV Guide for iPad omits the website’s search and the iPhone version’s ability to flag upcoming shows with alarms, but otherwise this is a first-rate TV guide for UK viewers. The interface is silky smooth, and you can easily omit channels you don’t watch.

TV guide for ipad

31. Adobe Photoshop Express

With people regularly moaning about bloat in Adobe’s desktop applications, it’s great to see the giant create something as focused and usable as Adobe Photoshop Express. Its toolset is strictly for basic edits (crop, straighten, rotate, flip, levels and lighting adjustments), and applying a few effects, but the app is fast, stable and extremely useable. Top marks.

Photoshop express

32. App Shopper

Prices on the App Store go up and down like a yo-yo, and Apple’s own wish-list mechanics leave a lot to be desired. You’re better off using App Shopper, which lists bargain apps and also enables you to compile a wish-list and be notified when an item drops in price.

AppShopper

33. Find my iPhone

Surprisingly freed by Apple from the shackles of the paid version of MobileMe, many users rapidly discovered they needed a 2010 device to sign up to Find my iPhone. Luckily, the iPad is a 2010 device, so it can be used to create an account; you can then add older iOS devices to keep an eye on where they are.

34. Flipboard

Initially, Flipboard looked like a gimmick, trying desperately to make online content resemble a magazine. But now it can integrate Google Reader, Flickr and other networks, beautifully laying out their articles, Flipboard’s muscled into the ‘essential’ category – and it’s still free.

Flipboard

35. Friendly for Facebook

Since Facebook doesn’t seem to be in a hurry to update its great iPhone app for the iPad, download Friendly instead. Its main advantage is speed – despite some oddball interface elements here and there, Friendly’s mostly, well, friendly. It also supports multiple accounts, offers customisable colours, and while it’s ad-supported, the ads aren’t obtrusive.

Friendly

36. IMDB

IMDB might be a wee bit US-focused at times (much like the movie industry), but the app is a great way to browse more movie-related info than you could ever hope to consume in a single lifetime. Settings enable you to define which sites IMDB and Amazon info is taken from, and the show times finder works pretty well.

IMDB for ipad

37. Read It Later Free

Read It Later and Instapaper battle it out for ‘article scraper’ king, but Read It Later trumps its rival in appealing to iPad-owning cheapskates. Instapaper requires a ‘pro’ purchase for iPad goodness, but Read It Later Free is, suitably, free. It’s also very fast and has a great original article/plain-text toggle.

38. TED

TED describes itself as “riveting talks by remarkable people, free to the world”. The app pretty much does as you’d expect – you get quick access to dozens of inspiring videos. However, it goes the extra mile in enabling you to save any talk for offline viewing, and also for providing hints on what to watch next if you’ve enjoyed a particular talk.

TED

39. Twitter

It’s a bit of a love-it-or-hate-it app, but Twitter showcases some breathtaking UI innovation; if you can deal with its unique way of presenting timelines and associated content, you’ll find it an efficient and intuitive means of using Twitter.

Twitter for ipad

40. Virtuoso Piano Free 2 HD

There’s not a great deal to piano app Virtuoso Piano Free 2 HD, but it’s not bad for a freebie. You get a dual-keyboard set-up, with optional key labels, and you can shift octaves and notes by prodding arrows. A really nice touch is the ‘duette’ [sic] button, which creates a second, mirror image, keyboard, so that two people can play at once.

Virtuoso piano free 2 hd

41. BBC iPlayer

Although not quite as satisfying as the desktop version, BBC iPlayer is a must-have download for iPad users. The slick interface makes it easy to browse/watch recent shows and current broadcasts. You can also choose from two quality settings and toggle subtitles, although there’s no AirPlay support to an Apple TV.

BBC iplayer

42. Sky News for iPad

Offering ‘three views on the news’, Sky News for iPad aims to do something a bit different to most video-based news apps. You get a timeline of recent stories, a prioritised scrollable grid of top stories and ‘rewindable’ live coverage. It’s all very tactile and usable, and it has AirPlay support.

Sky news for ipad

43. LoopJ Interactive DJ Station

LoopJ is a loop-based DJ-style tool with two virtual decks. Select a deck, position the crossfader accordingly, tap play and then prod loops to cue them up. It’s less versatile than Looptastic but more immediate, although getting your own music into the app is a chore, so stick with using it as a fun audio toy.

LoopJ

44. Dragon Dictation

There’s always something slightly spooky about voice recognition software, as if Skynet’s listening in or something, but such tools had for years been out of most people’s reach. Now, Dragon Dictation is free for iOS. It’s eerily accurate, trainable and, despite the dev recommending you use an external microphone, the app works fine with the iPad’s built-in one.

45. Remote

Although pretty basic on the iPhone, Remote on the iPad is akin to a stripped-down iTunes when it comes to accessing network libraries and playing music. It’s also indispensable if you have an Apple TV and want to control it with something other than the hateful metal chewing-gum stick that ships with the device.

Remote

46. Pulse News Reader

When unveiled, RSS reader Pulse was divisive, with an unresponsive oddball interface. But it’s evolved to become free and fast, and is now a tactile, enjoyable way to catch up on news. The image-oriented interface, with slider-based RSS feeds (akin to those in the BBC News app) and configurable tab groups, makes it particularly suitable for anyone who subscribes to image-heavy sites.

Pulse

47. Fotopedia Heritage

Rather like The Guardian Eyewitness, Fotopedia Heritage is perfect for anyone who enjoys awe-inspiring photography. The app enables you to browse 25,000 photos of beautiful locations worldwide. It also provides information about each location, and can be used for travel planning through favourites and links to TripAdvisor.

48. Yell

If you’re in an unfamiliar place or travelling somewhere new, Yell is a great app for figuring out what amenities are available locally. The interface is responsive and efficient, and you can handily add any business you find as a favourite for easy access later on.

Yell

49. XE Currency for iPad

It’s as ugly as they come, but XE Currency is the best free currency app you’ll find. You define which currencies you want to see, along with the number of decimals to show. Double-tap a currency and you can set it as the base currency by tapping 1.0 in the calculator, or do bespoke conversions by typing any other value.

XE currency for ipad

50. Classical Guitar

In some ways we prefer this freebie virtual guitar to the one in Apple’s impressive GarageBand for iPad. With Classical Guitar, you can strum, pick strings and use a sliding fretboard. Importantly, though, you can create user-defined chord sets, making this a useful app for writing basic acoustic songs.

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