How to Disinfect a Vacuum Cleaner

Just because a vacuum helps create a clean home doesn’t mean it doesn’t need cleaning, too. Your vacuum removes dirt, debris and other stain-causing substances from floors and furniture on a regular basis. Vacuumed debris may contain bacteria or mold, so it’s important to clean and disinfect the Dyson DC44 vacuum cleaner battery on a regular basis to ensure bacteria and mold spores don’t spread to other areas of your home. You can kill germs, bacteria and mold and maintain a clean, sanitary vacuum with simple supplies and procedures.

Toss out the old vacuum bag. Place the bag in a plastic trash bag and seal it to prevent mold or bacteria from transferring to other surfaces.

Spray the inside of the vacuum with disinfectant spray to kill germs. Wait two to three minutes before putting a new vacuum bag inside and closing the vacuum. If there are any fabric-covered areas on the vacuum, spray them with the disinfectant spray, too.

Pour 1 qt. undiluted white vinegar into a bucket. Wet a clean cloth with the vinegar and wring out the excess moisture.

Clean the exterior of the vacuum by wiping it off completely with the vinegar. Rinse the cloth as dirt and stains are removed. Apply more vinegar and continue to clean until you’ve cleaned the entire vacuum. Dry the vacuum with a clean cloth.

Dampen a clean cloth with rubbing alcohol. Disinfect the vacuum cleaner battery for Dyson DC45 by wiping it off with the rubbing alcohol. Allow the vacuum to air-dry so the alcohol can kill any bacteria or germs left behind.

Disinfect the vacuum handle and other areas commonly touched each week. Give the entire vacuum a cleaning once each month. Increase cleaning and disinfecting, as needed, when there’s been exposure to illness or mold.

Always unplug the Dyson DC58 battery and any other electrical appliance before cleaning.

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Difference Between Starter and Leisure Batteries Explained

Knowing the difference between a power tool battery that starts an engine, and one that is meant to supply electricity over a long period of time without the benefit of a running engine, can save you a lot of otherwise wasted money.

The basic, and still preferred battery in common use is the very ordinary lead acid type. There are variants of course, such as glass mat and gel types, but standard lead acid batteries are still much loved and the most efficient. Let’s have a look at the jobs these batteries are required to do.

Starter Batteries, as the name suggests, are designed to start an engine. This requires the battery to supply a burst of what is known as ‘cold cranking amps’ or CCA to the engine’s starter motor, for a very short period of time. This burst can run into hundreds of amps if an engine is cold. When the engine starts, it immediately begins to recharge the battery so that the cycle can be repeated as required.

Starter batteries are good at this because of their internal design. The lead pasted plates inside the Panasonic cordless drill battery are intentionally made thin as this enables the super fast discharge required in engine starting. However, if you’ve accidentally left your car’s lights on for any length of time, you may well have come back to the vehicle, only to find that the engine won’t start, or is reluctant to start because the battery has been at least partially flattened. Starter batteries are not good at any kind of repeated extended discharge and can be severely damaged in a very short time if used in this way.

To be fit for purpose, Leisure Batteries, as used as domestic batteries on boats, motor homes and as storage devices for solar panel output etc., must be capable of ‘deep cycle’ use. Batteries used to drive electric golf buggies and electric wheel chairs etc., are a typical example of ‘deep cycle’ batteries. These batteries are charged overnight and gradually discharged when in use. If you attempted this with a standard starter battery it would literally die in a very short time.

Deep Cycle Batteries are manufactured with much thicker plates than starter batteries, but will, in fact, start an engine. However, they are not really made for that purpose.

The American battery company, Trojan, manufacture a variety of deep cycle and semi traction batteries and have done so since about 1925. I only mention this because their batteries were my own choice for our boat. We live aboard full time, and reliable battery power is very important to us. In the event of no mains shore power being available, we can produce our own by using our deep cycle leisure battery bank to power an electrical inverter. We can do this, if we need to, over an extended period by using our engine to recharge the batteries.

If you are going to invest in leisure, deep cycle, traction or semi traction Ryobi power tool batteries make sure that you use a well respected supplier. If you do not, and simply look at the price tag instead, you will more than likely regret it.

If you’d like to see it, I have a Short Video from the Trojan Battery Company, that shows just how their batteries are manufactured, and explains why deep cycle batteries are made the way that they are. Starter batteries are, in their own way, so much simpler than deep cycle types. You can generally purchase this type of battery, if you’ve heard of the maker, and be okay. This is most definitely not the case with deep cycle batteries.

 

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How to Dispose of NiMH Drill Batteries

An NiMH, or nickel-metal hydride cell battery, is a rechargeable Paslode cordless drill battery often found in electronic products, such as digital cameras, laptops, cell phones and toys. Once the NiMH batteries die, they should not be disposed of in the regular garbage. Handle them as hazardous waste and dispose of them through your county’s hazardous waste program, or should recycle them. Many large retailers take part in a rechargeable battery recycling program.

Place the rechargeable batteries in a plastic sandwich bag until you are ready to dispose of them.

Call the Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation at 1-800-822-8831. They will provide you with a list of companies and local businesses that participate in rechargeable battery recycling in your area.

Locate the recycling bin in the participating store, usually located towards the front of the store. Remove the Dyson tool batteries from the bag and place in the slot.

Place the rechargeable batteries in a plastic sandwich bag until you are ready to dispose of them.

Use a phone book or online search engine to locate the hazardous waste department in your county and call that agency to ask about hazardous waste disposal.

Follow the directions given to you by your local hazardous waste department for disposing of the batteries. Depending on the county, they may have specific curbside hazardous waste pick up days or specific locations to collect the hazardous waste.

Nickel-cadmium batteries, also known as NiCd and NiCad, are rechargeable batteries made from nickel oxide hydroxide and metallic cadmium.

NiCd batteries are commonly found in rechargeable products, such as cell phones, digital cameras, camcorders, laptops and power tools. With repeated use, the battery charges and drains, which leads to a lose of effectiveness. The amount of time the battery is capable of powering a device lessens. Reconditioning can rejuvenate the battery.

Charge the NiCd battery. Depending on the product the battery is contained in, charging the battery may consists of attaching a charger to the electronic device or removing the battery and placing it in a NiCd battery charger. Keep the battery in the charger until it is full. Unplug all power adapters.

Turn the electronic device on. If needed, place the AEG power tool battery back into the electronic device prior to turning the unit on. Allow the device to run on battery power until the battery is dead or completely drained. Alternatively, some charging units have a discharge switch. If the unit has a discharge switch, flip this switch until the battery is drained. The discharge switch is more common on battery chargers for large batteries, such as those on large power tools.

Continue to repeat the charging and recharging process until it has been done three to five times, depending on the size of the battery. The reconditioning process should be completed every six months or as needed to restore lost efficiency.

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Replace NiCad Batteries With Lithium Batteries

Replacing NiCad batteries with lithium Paslode cordless drill batteries can be as simple as popping out the old ones and putting in the new ones or as complicated as having a battery pack custom made for the job, depending on the type of lithium battery and the application for which you use it. NiCad batteries are rechargeable while lithium batteries are disposable and not designed to be reused.

Remove the standard-sized nickel cadmium (NiCad) batteries from your battery-powered device. Standard lithium batteries will come in the same sizes, like AA, AAA, 9 volt, C or D cells.

Select a disposable lithium Dyson vacuum cleaner battery in a size that matches the original NiCad batteries. Most regular lithium batteries are not rechargeable and can be treated as any ordinary disposable battery.

Insert the batteries into the device. Make sure you have them turned the right direction as indicated in the battery compartment.

Remove the NiCad battery pack from your rechargeable phone or other electronic device. Lithium-Ion batteries are generally not made in standard sizes, but come in specialized rechargeable battery packs designed for devices that charge the batteries in place, like cell phones and computers.

Check the size of the pack, the voltage and amperage put out by the pack. If you cannot find a standard pack, many battery stores will create a custom lithium-ion battery pack for you. Be sure the new lithium battery pack you purchase matches the old one.

Connect the battery pack to the device and insert the pack. Lithium-ion batteries tend to outlast NiCads in most applications. Check the owner’s manual for your device to make sure you can replace the original NiCad pack with lithium-ions. Not all devices using NiCad battery packs can use lithium packs.

Charge the lithium-ion battery pack inside the device if it was not charged when you inserted it. Allow the full charging time to pass before using your electronic device if this is the first time the battery has been charged.

Normally you cannot switch between a NiMH or NiCad Hitachi power tool battery and a lithium-ion battery in a digital camera.  Most use standard sizes and you can use lithium batteries, but do not attempt to recharge them.

Some electronic devices, like cell phones, are designed to use either NiCads, nickel metal hybrids (NIMH) or lithium-ion batteries. Check your owner’s manual.

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How to Repair a Jacobs Cordless Drill Chuck

The Jacobs chuck is the mechanical device on the tip of the drill that fastens all drill bits and extensions in place. Jacobs drill chucks are commonly used in high-powered electric drills. When your Jacobs chuck breaks, repairing the chuck means replacing it with a new chuck. This requires that you partially dismantle the drill, which can void your drill’s warranty if you cause damage to the cordless drill batteries while replacing the chuck.

Unplug your drill’s power cord or remove the battery pack if your drill is cordless. Disable the drill’s trigger by pressing the locking button above or near the trigger. Place the drill on a sturdy work surface.

Grasp the chuck and rotate it counterclockwise until the jaws are fully expanded.

Determine how the chuck is fastened to the Hitachi power tool battery spindle. Most Jacobs chucks are fastened with a single screw. This will be either a Phillips screw on the bottom side of the chuck or an Allen screw inside the chuck. Since most Jacobs chucks use a left-handed screw, turn the screw clockwise until the screw is removed from its threaded hole.

Insert the hex wrench that came with your drill into the Jacobs chuck. Place the drill so the chuck is hanging off the side of your work table. Strike the wrench so the chuck rotates counterclockwise. This will knock the chuck loose from the drill’s spindle. Remove the chuck from the drill.

Place the new Jacobs chuck onto your drill’s spindle so the threads on the spindle align with the threads inside the chuck. Rotate the chuck clockwise until it is firmly fastened to the drill’s spindle. Reattach the chuck’s retaining screw and tighten by turning Firestorm cordless drill battery counterclockwise.

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Replace NiCad Tool Batteries With Lithium Drill Batteries

Replacing NiCad Bosch cordless drill  battery with lithium batteries can be as simple as popping out the old ones and putting in the new ones or as complicated as having a battery pack custom made for the job, depending on the type of lithium battery and the application for which you use it. NiCad batteries are rechargeable while lithium batteries are disposable and not designed to be reused.

Remove the standard-sized nickel cadmium (NiCad) batteries from your battery-powered device. Standard lithium batteries will come in the same sizes, like AA, AAA, 9 volt, C or D cells.

Select a disposable lithium battery in a size that matches the original NiCad batteries. Most regular lithium batteries are not rechargeable and can be treated as any ordinary disposable battery.

Insert the batteries into the device. Make sure you have them turned the right direction as indicated in the battery compartment.

Remove the NiCad battery pack from your rechargeable phone or other electronic device. Lithium-Ion batteries are generally not made in standard sizes, but come in specialized rechargeable battery packs designed for devices that charge the batteries in place, like cell phones and computers.

Check the size of the pack, the voltage and amperage put out by the pack. If you cannot find a standard pack, many battery stores will create a custom lithium-ion battery pack for you. Be sure the new lithium Paslode cordless drill battery pack you purchase matches the old one.

Charge the lithium-ion battery pack if you have an external battery pack.

Connect the battery pack to the device and insert the pack. Lithium-ion batteries tend to outlast NiCads in most applications. Check the owner’s manual for your device to make sure you can replace the original NiCad pack with lithium-ions. Not all devices using NiCad battery packs can use lithium packs.

Charge the lithium-ion battery pack inside the device if it was not charged when you inserted it. Allow the full charging time to pass before using your electronic device if this is the first time the battery has been charged.

Normally you cannot switch between a NiMH or NiCad Black & Decker drill battery and a lithium-ion battery in a digital camera.  Most use standard sizes and you can use lithium batteries, but do not attempt to recharge them.

Some electronic devices, like cell phones, are designed to use either NiCads, nickel metal hybrids (NIMH) or lithium-ion batteries. Check your owner’s manual.

Do not attempt to recharge standard lithium batteries.

Do not use lithium-ion batteries in devices not made to use them.

Recycle old lithium batteries.

Do not incinerate lithium batteries–they can explode.

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What to Do If Your Dell Laptop Charger Stops Working

If you own a Dell laptop, then let’s take a moment to understand what your Laptop Charger is. It’s a device which supplies energy to a laptop. All you have to do is plug it into an electrical outlet and it begins working immediately. It works in a double way. The energy will charge the computer’s battery while providing power for the computer as well. A typical dell laptop charger takes input supply of 100-240V (or roughly 1.5A) and output of 19.5 V (or roughly 3.34A).

Your charger may stop working for various reasons. It may be because of inadequate power supply or the charger could become worn and frayed so that the wiring is exposed. If that is what has happened, then the Charger could stop working and will not charge Dell MR90Y battery. Even if the device is still functioning and you notice this problem, stop using it. It could be a fire hazard and that’s a risk you shouldn’t take.

Check how long you have been using the charger

Dell recommends batteries to run for 18 to 24 months. After this run time, there might be a need to change them. If this is the case, browse through Dell website and go to “Dell Adapters and Chargers” Section. On the displayed page, choose your laptop model like Inspiron, Adamo, Alienware, Studio etc. Typically your model number can be found engraved on your Dell laptop

What if your laptop is still in warranty period?

If your Dell laptop charger is not working and you are still in warranty period, then Dell have strong replacement guaranty. You need to contact Dell customer support to log a ticket and they will explain you the entire process. If you are not aware of customer support contact details, log on to dell.com website and click on “Contact Technical Support” section. You have options to call them, email them or chat online with expert advisors of Dell XCMRD laptop battery.

Should we go for cheaper non-Dell replacement batteries?

There are a lot of companies making replacement chargers and selling them at cheaper price than original Dell laptop chargers. Some of these chargers might work as well but it is always recommended to accept genuine Dell chargers as they are well equipped and are compliant to Dell’s product standard. They are engineered to enhance safety and performance of your Dell System. Also, only Dell laptop chargers are supported by Dell technicians and if there is a problem in your system because of frayed non-Dell battery, then laptop battery for  Dell Latitude E6400 might not replace it.

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What Is a Dewalt XRP

DeWalt XRP is a line of cordless tools that utilize high-capacity Lithium-Ion batteries. The DeWalt XRP line includes cordless drill/drivers and hammer drills. The XRP line was completely redesigned from its predecessors, for improved performance, longer run time between charges and longer overall life of the batteries. Many of the XRP Dewalt DE9039 batteries are backwards compatible with previous DeWalt cordless drill models.

Batteries

The heart of the DeWalt XRP line is a new nano-phosphate formula lithium-ion batteries. DeWalt claims that these new batteries have improved durability can be re-charged up to 2000 times over the life of the battery. The line includes 18-volt, 14.4-volt and 12-volt models.

Drill Transmission

Each model in the DeWalt XRP drill line has a three-speed transmission (where most other Dewalt DE9095 drill battery have a two-speed transmission). This extra gear allows the drilling action to adapted appropriately for the task at hand. First gear is for wood drilling with hole saws, second gear for auger bits and third gear for hammer drilling into concrete.

Drill Motor and Chuck

The DeWalt XRP line of drills incorporates improvements to the drill motors and chucks. The high-efficiency, frameless motors are designed to have 30 percent more run time, and are connected to a self-tightening chuck to help keep the bits from slipping.

Durability

The DeWalt XRP line is designed with all steel gears and a metal gear case, that not only gives the drill greater durability than previous models, but it allows the drill to have greater dissipation of heat. The drill motor brushes are also easily accessible for quick replacement.

Ergonomics

The DeWalt XRP line has been designed so that the Dewalt DE9096 tool battery has better balance, and a cushioned ergonomic grip to help reduce operator fatigue. Each XRP drill also includes an LED work light to illuminate the work surface.

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Learn to use a cord model and a cordless model drill.

Drills come in a few different styles. The most common we see are cord and cordless. Cord drills have a power cable and need to be plugged into a electrical source. Cordless uses a battery. If the Makita power tool battery is discharged, place it into the chargers charging receptacle.

For a cordless drill, insert the charged battery (most will only fit in one way) open the chuck if it is keyless just spin the chuck in the desired direction for opening or closing the chuck. The Chuck is the part of the drill that holds your bit. It needs to be tight so that the bit will not spin in the chuck causing damage to the bit or the chuck. Once the chuck is open insert your bit that is required for the job (either drill bit for holes, view sizes as needed located on drill bit or on the package, or the proper screw driver bit that matches the head of the screw you are working with) Close the chuck tight and depress the trigger on the drill. Check that the bit spins and does not wobble and that the drill is charged. Select the proper direction for either forward or reverse. Most drills have a speed selector on the top marked H for high speed and L for low speed. Select the proper speed in accordance to the project you are working on. There may also be a torque clutch that can be adjusted, the lower the setting the less torque the drill will put out the higher the setting the more the torque. For drilling use the higher setting, for putting screws into dry wall to hang pictures you may want to use a low setting (i.e. 4) so not to strip the threading.

Corded drills work under the same principal. Plug in the cord. Most corded drills have a keyed chuck which requires a small tool normally in a holder located on the power cable. insert the “stared) end in to the small hole on the chuck so that the teeth mesh and turn the key to open and close the chuck. At this time place the correct bit into the chuck and close the chuck tight. Depress the trigger and verify that the Milwaukee cordless drill battery have power and that the bit doesn’t wobble.

Wear proper saftey equipment such as saftey glasses and any other equipment you may need to prevent injury.

If the bit wobbles in the chuck open the chuck and reseat the bit in between the jaw posts and retighten the chuck and depress the trigger to verify if the the problem is corrected.

Wear proper safety equipment to reduce the risk of injury.

Do not operate equipment while impaired the Bosch cordless drill batteries.

Do not operate electrical tools under wet conditions due to risk of shock.

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Dead and dying cordless drill batteries

And Then There Were None

All of my cordless drills were using Ni-Cd cordless drill batteries and like any rechargeable battery, you reach a point in time when the battery begins to lose the ability to hold a full charge, then to hold a charge at all. One by one, my rechargeable batteries succumbed to age, as they reached their maximum number of charge cycles and stopped working. The Makita died first, then the DeWalts and the Black and Decker. The Skill was next, then the Ryobi. The Fein is nearing its greater reward as well. Where I once had drills to spare, I now have a collection of tools with dead and dying batteries.

Thankfully the Fein drills are still working, but they do not last as long as they once did. The clock is ticking… No problem, I thought I would just get some new batteries and I would be back in business. I had been putting off buying new batteries because I always had several other drills that were working. When I began to have more dead batteries than working ones, I had had enough and I drove to the local mega-hardware box store to get a handful of new batteries.

A Rude Awakening

Whoa Partner! The cost to replace two batteries with most of the models was 50% or more of the original cost, with each battery costing give or take at the time (They have come down a bit since that time). Humm… I decided to cut bait instead of fish and I left the store with nothing. On the drive home I thought that with the high cost of replacement batteries, I might as well buy a totally new one, which comes with two new batteries and a new charger. Sounds good, but then what do you do with the old power heads? It’s easy enough to take the dead batteries to the recycling centre, but what do you do with several power heads that still work, but just need a good battery?

Undaunted

With no easy solution at hand, I decided to check into getting the batteries rebuilt at a local battery rebuilding service. Rebuilt batteries were about half the cost of factory built new batteries, so I thought that might be the way to go. At least it would be cheaper and I could get higher Amp-hour batteries installed during the rebuild. More power! Using rebuilt batteries also allows the continued use of my existing power heads, which are still in good shape. As I was getting ready to drive back over to the power tool battery shop to drop off 10 – 12 battery packs to get rebuilt, I quickly added up the cost.

Whoa Partner! At per rebuilt battery, I would be pouring a significant amount of money back into several old tools. Some of which (like the 9.6volt and the 14.4volt), lacked enough power and run time for my current needs. Being born in the year of the rat made me want to stretch more life out of the older ones, but the numbers were not adding up. I kept looking around the Internet and found a few companies that sold new “no-name” battery replacements for a little less than the rebuilt ones I was quoted.

Decisions, Decisions

However, I had never dealt with any of these companies before and most of the websites offered little, or no technical specs on their batteries. Without knowing the Amp-hour rating of the batteries, it makes it hard to compare different brands, so I kept looking. The new Lithium-ion cordless models were beginning to lure me into the abyssal vortex. Lithium-ion batteries are smaller and lighter than the same voltage Ni-Cd battery, which is a big benefit since my 18volt gets tiresome after using it all day.

I also thought about getting a 24volt, but the 24volt models seemed to be made for folks with forearms like Popeye the sailor man. Luckily, I never succumbed to the lure of 24volt drills. They were just too heavy to use all day, or for the occasional odd job around the studio. Then came the 28volt models, then the 36volt mega-extreme… I resisted once again. The Lithium-ion versions of the higher voltage tools were quite a bit less in weight, but still seemed like overkill for what I needed.

While it’s easy enough to just buy a new drill or two, the dilemma of what to do with my old power heads remained. It seemed like a waste to just throw them away! I guess old cordless tools are a lot like other tools and equipment, when they quit working you just get a new one and pitch them into the rubbish bin.

Another Option

One last option that I considered was to get a few Lithium-ion batteries for my existing 18volt DeWalts. The DeWalt line of 18volt tools can use the newer lithium-ion batteries, as well as the regular Ni-Cd’s, but you have to get a new charger to use the Lithium-ion batteries. So if you’re thinking about doing this as well, add up the costs before you lay out the plastic.

Two DeWalt Lithium-ion 18volt batteries and a charger are none too cheap. (One 18volt DeWalt Lithium-ion battery and a charger is around £108.83 ($179.00), two batteries and a charger is about £187.26 ($308.00), which is the same cost as a new 18volt DeWalt ½” NP-Lithium-ion cordless model, charger and two batteries – £187.87 ($309.00) at a large online merchant.

Note: There is no difference in power or run time between Ni-Cd and Lithium-ion batteries of the same voltage and Amp-hour rating. None, zip, nada. The main benefits of moving to Lithium-ion batteries over Ni-Cd’s is less weight, a more compact size and virtually no self-discharge of the battery when not in use. Lithium-ion formulas vary however, some are better or worse than traditional Ni-Cd’s, or NiMH batteries.

Decision Made

Well, after much deliberation I have decided to get a new 18volt Nano-Phosphate Lithium-ion based cordless drill (DeWalts NPLI battery is good for 2000 recharges, versus 800 recharges for their current Ni-Cd battery), instead of replacing/rebuilding my old dead batteries – with one exception! The Fein drills are just too well made and smooth running to discard, so I’ll be keeping those and rebuilding their batteries in the near future. As for my old DeWalt drills, those will get pitched/recycled and the Bosch power tool batteries will go to my local recycling centre.

The logic for keeping the old cordless tools and rebuilding them just never worked out. Not when I can get a brand new model with Lithium-ion technology that weighs less, for less money than rebuilding all of the batteries for the old drills. Now all I have to do is decide which new drill I want. If any of you have a Lithium-ion drill and you like it, let me know. If you don’t like your new Lithium-ion drill, let me know that as well. I still can’t get used to the idea that a drill costing a few hundred dollars is disposable!

Safety Note: Always follow all manufacturers safety instructions before working with your lathe, or any of the tools or products you may use. If you are unsure about any operation, obtain competent professional instruction before proceeding. Use and wear all necessary safety devices during turning and observe safe woodturning practices to prevent accident or injury.

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